• Reflection

    All blames are not equal

    We are all to be blamed (for Corruption in Nagaland). But are we equally to be blamed? Generalization of the blame is the game that people in power play to keep things as they are. Even before any work is executed, minister of a department cuts a certain percentage of the department fund. Not satisfied with the slice that he cut out at source, he interferes and paralyses the department activities. He takes the lion’s share of the appointments by placing people who are not fit for the job. He inserts people where there are no vacancies making the government spend excess on salaries. He then takes the lion’s share…

  • Reflection

    Who is responsible? Who will turn it around?

    How did it happen that we have become opposites of how we used to be? …Can we turn it around again for the generations to come? It is told time and again that Nagas were simple, honest and trustworthy. So, in public speeches and writings, appeals are made to revisit that past and cultivate or uphold that past collective character of our forefathers. That past is also often spoken in the context of the present situation where the stark contrast is projected: That we have become opposites of what we used to be. ‘There is no honesty or integrity and we have become corrupt from top to bottom’, people say…

  • Reflection

    Foot-Away-From-The-Mouth Syndrome

    In the ‘foot-away-from-the-mouth syndrome’, the mouth is somewhere and the foot is somewhere else. You can find the mouth somewhere, but the foot is somewhere far away; God knows where. A cabinet minister in Nagaland is a self-professed ‘foot-in-the-mouth syndrome’ patient. He said and I only quote, “I am aware of my ‘foot-in-the-mouth’ syndrome which has already created so many enemies in my life unnecessarily”. His own party had to apologize on his behalf and express regret for his statement while the opposition party stated that the moment he opened his mouth, ‘his foot will be in his mouth’. After his own party split, members of the splinter party who…

  • Reflection

    Who to blame? Let us be specific

    When we say that the public is also to be blamed for the messy situation we are in, does that mean that the baby girl who was born last night in a remote village in Myanmar border is also to be blamed? Let’s be specific. ‘Public’ is a heterogeneous group with angels and demons and every type in between. Generalizing the blame is not just for those who are not corrupt yet suffer for someone else’s faults. Blaming the public is a favorite prop politicians use to legitimize their actions. But let’s face this truth: Politicians are homogeneous in so far as corruption is concerned. By virtue of their power…